The Museum of Street Culture at The Stewpot will present exhibitions and public programs that link the early film history of 508 Park with the music recorded there. 

The Museum will also focus on the homeless and the art they create, as well as current directions in street culture, including performance, installation, and emerging art forms.


What did a film vault look like? How were field recordings in the 1930s made?

Pat Bywaters playing a 78 recorded at 508. Also shown Alan Govenar, founding director of the Museum of Street Culture.

Pat Bywaters playing a 78 recorded at 508. Also shown Alan Govenar, founding director of the Museum of Street Culture.

How did the social dislocations of the 1930s influence art and music? What was the legacy of Deep Ellum’s blue musicians of the 1920s? What did the music recorded at 508 in the 1930s sound like? What is the relationship between street artists of the 1930s and street culture today? We’re excited to be pioneering a way of exploring past and present through a Museum that takes its inspiration from the street.

The museum will feature photographs, drawings, paintings, and sculpture, as well as historical artifacts, ephemera and interactive media. Temporary exhibitions will focus on current directions in street culture, including performance, installation and emerging art forms.

The Museum of Street Culture expands the outreach of The Stewpot and is grounded in the experience of people who are often ignored. It dignifies what is usually seen as unimportant and irrelevant. Exhibitions and public programs will break down stereotypes of both Museum and homelessness.

The museum will provide greater visibility to many of The Stewpot’s pioneering initiatives — The Open Art Studio and Gallery, StreetZine newspaper, and ongoing concerts, workshops, and musical events.

The Museum of Street Culture is an extension of The Stewpot’s four-decades long efforts to forge community between disparate worlds.